Monday, April 14, 2014

Angled Matched Binding

I've been meaning to write this post for ages. Whether you know what I mean by matched binding or not, as a refresher, I suggest you read this post. I'll wait . . .
SO, as I said then, matching binding at a 'straight' seam is about 150% times easier than at an angle. I have managed doing it at an angle twice, but both times it was a headache, and I knew I needed to take the time to document the process so I didn't have to waste time re-figuring it out every time I wanted to do it. So finally, this past week, I did just that.

To start, measure around your quilt and jot down how many inches of each color of binding you will need, allowing yourself at least 6-8" extra in length for each section. Then cut strips for each section, and press each in half lengthwise just like you'd usually do for double-fold binding. Lay two colored strips alongside your quilt, about where they will be sewn on. Cut both ends on an angle as shown below. Do take note of the angle you are trying to match. Pictured, mine happens to be a 60-degree angle on my quilt, so I cut the binding at 60-degrees, just in the opposite direction.
Stitch ends with 1/4" seam. Press seam open, then repress binding strip for a nice edge.
Pin the binding to the quilt, with raw edges matching.
Fold binding strip up so you can see how things are lining up. Unpin and adjust as needed.
Now to tackle the next angle. Pin binding to quilt every few inches, smoothing as you go and placing a pin at the next binding color change location.
Turn binding up and using a removable marking pen, make a mark on the side next to the quilt, extending the angle of the line.
Unpin the binding strip, lay a clear ruler over your mark, and draw a line 1/4" away, toward the loose end of the binding. Use your rotary cutter to cut along this longer line. Now you're ready to cut and add the next color as in the first step above. Continue on as your particular project requires! Though it involves some up and down, I find it easiest to machine-stitch one connection and pin it in place, then measure, cut, and add another color, pin in place, etc., moving around the perimeter of your quilt. Eventually you'll have the entire binding pinned on and you'll just machine-stitch it on. I usually finish my binding with hand-stitching, but if you machine-stitch your binding, it should work the same way.
Good luck and have fun using this technique on just the right quilt!

If you try this method, be sure and add a picture to Quilting with A Quilter's Table on flickr!

26 comments:

Nilya said...

Only one word: FANTASTIC!!! :)

Sigrun said...

Gosh you're clever! Absolutely fabulous!

Sigrun said...

Gosh you're clever! Absolutely fabulous!

Tina Craig said...

Thanks for writing this up for us. Your bindings are legendary!

RaspberrySunshine said...

Wowzers!! Pinned this so I could use it soon :) Great work Deb! Cindy

Svetlana said...

this is such a fantastic idea Debbie. Thanks for sharing.

M-R Charbonneau said...

Thanks for sharing this, Debbie. I'm pinning it for future reference!

Heather @ Winding Bobbins said...

What great results! Don't know if I have patience for this though....I just want to get to the hand stitching ASAP! Haha ��

andpins said...

That is awesome! Thank you so much for sharing!

claudia said...

That's a lot of brain work...no wonder the headache! Thank you for sharing this!
It's beautiful!!!

aangto said...

WOW! I'm quite in awe of this. I love the HST "spiraled" quilt!

Jeannie said...

You are amazing!

Jean(ie) said...

Debbie, thanks so much for posting this! It's something new to me! You bet your bippy (whatever a bibby is) that I pinned that for future reference. I like that look!

Katy Cameron said...

The is great, but you are a far, far better woman than I for attempting this!

Sandra @SewofCourse said...

Thank you for the tutorial, it's brilliant and I'm sure I will try it some day!

Anne said...

Thanks for sharing this. I've done something similar before but it's been awhile so a refresher is very good.

MariQuilts said...

This is brilliant.....thanks for sharing.

feelincrafty said...

Thanks for this!! You are such a pro at it! I love it!!! I can't wait to try it. Pinning it so I can try it soon.

Pam said...

Thanks for sharing this with us. I have a few quilts tht i have been wanting to do this on but was unsure how to go about.

Marci Girl said...

You made this whole process seem easy! And it certainly looks great on a quilt!

diane said...

that was a good tutorial. Thanks

Denise Russell said...

Thank you! Now I may actually try it!

Spontaneous Threads said...

once again another post to make us all better quilters! Thank you Debbie.

Sarah said...

Thanks for showing us how it's done. I love the look of a matched binding, but I don't think I'll ever do one. Too fiddly for me! By the time I get to binding stage it's pedal to the metal to get it finished.

joycita said...

You have so much more patience than I do. Since most of my quilting is for charity, I'm into "finished" more that creativity. But there is a quilt for ME on the horizon, and I will try this.
Thanks for sharing.

Mara said...

ohhh.. now to make a quilt that requires angled binding, very cool.