Friday, November 1, 2019

Pieced Batting

The other day, as I was piecing batting scraps together for my latest quilt, I was so pleased how nicely they went together, I thought it worth sharing. I know lots of folks zig-zag their batting scraps together, but I've never had good luck with that method. I end up with bumps and the result is never as smooth as I'd like. So enter an alternative method.


To start, I almost always use Warm & White batting, which is pretty flat to begin with. It's important to have straight edges butting together, so if you need to cut fresh edges on your batting scraps, definitely do. Since I always have a bolt of fusible SF101 interfacing on hand, I cut several 1" strips to get me started. Then it's the simple process of laying your scraps on your ironing surface, straight edges together, and ironing a strip of interfacing over the 'seam'. Once you iron on one strip, add on another, slightly overlapping the ends. When you reach the edge of your batting, just trim the strip. Then I like to turn the whole piece over and do the flip side of the seam as well.


When it comes to quilting quilt sandwiches with this kind of pieced batting, I haven't found any issues. Instead, I celebrate the smoothness of the batt seams and the use of those batting bits. All in all, a very good thing.

24 comments:

  1. Great tip, thanks for sharing!

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  2. I've used the tape and it works great. I've never figured out how someone zigzags. Their zigs and zags must be way better than mine!

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  3. Oh, I always seem to end up with skinny strips of SF101, what a great use for them!

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  4. I need to try this. I've got lots of batting scraps. Thanks!

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  5. I use batting seam tape, which is also fusible. Same technique. Amazon sells it.

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  6. After I zig zag, I hold my iron above the seam and steam. This relaxes the bump and I flatten with my fingers. I will be trying the 'tape'as well. I like options.

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  7. Doesn't the batting stick to your iron?

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    1. Hi Debbie, responding here since I don't have your email. But no, the batt I use - Warm & White - does not stick to my iron at all. I often press it before I baste a quilt.

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    2. I would also add that you need to lower the temperature on your iron before you use the batting tape so that you don't risk the batting being damaged slightly. I have sometimes had the batting scrim stick to my iron. But almost always, with a lower temperature that is hot enough to make the fusing stick, it is perfect! I use the batting tape all the time. I never zig zag, and have always had great luck!

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  8. I've seen batting seam tape before, but never used it. I zig zag my scraps together and it has worked well. Your method using SF101 (which I do have) is very interesting! Does is stay fused?

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  9. Replies
    1. It's a type of Pellon interfacing. This type is very lightweight and is used by many quilters to stabilize tee shirts for quilts.

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    2. Thanks Sylvia. It is also woven (and fusible), which is another reason it works well for this use.

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  10. sounds like a great idea i will try it for sure

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  11. Interesting, Debbie! I wouldn't have thought to use SF101 to join batting pieces. I've always overlapped batting pieces to cut wavy curves through both layers and then match them up. I don't machine sew though, but take large herringbone stitches by hand. You haven't had a problem with that straight line showing through a quilt? That's what I'd be concerned about.

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  12. I use the same method and it works great! I used to use the roll of batting tape but they were expensive and I always have scraps of SF101. I only put it on one side of the batting and have not had issues.

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  13. I'll have to look out for SF101. I'm not sure if its available in Australia? Maybe other forms of interfacing would work. I think I'll give it a go...! Thanks for sharing!

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  14. Thank you so much! Those scraps drive me crazy. I will be do this from now on.

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  15. I have always used the batting tape, but using SF101 is a great idea. Thanks for the tip.

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  16. Thank you for sharing your tip ! Not sure I can find this kind of interfacing but I could try with something similar.

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  17. I have seen batting tape but it always appeared very expensive. Love your idea to cut it yourself, never occured to me... Though I have to figure out what kind of German interfacing to buy that is the closest to your version.

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    1. Just googled a bit and in case any other Germans/Europeans or Internationals are wondering: The closest equivalent is supposed to be G700.

      This link is a cool chart for a lot of interfacings: http://www.amybutlerdesign.com/pdfs/InterfacingChart.pdf

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  18. I just tried this tonight Nd it worked great... thanks for a useful tip!

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