Friday, September 24, 2021

At the Table

Coming right out and saying it.... I have a new foodie obsession. OK, I've only made them twice, but I'm scouring the internet for recipes and plotting when I can make them again. I'm talking about popovers.

The recipe that spoke to me so loudly that I went to purchase a popover pan in the first place was Half Baked Harvest's Parmesan Popovers with Crispy Sage Garlic Butter. Sage is one of the most prolific plants in our herb garden right now, so I know that was part of it. But also, popovers had been an enigma to me for ages. If I'd ever had them, I didn't remember, and on an impulse, I decided to find out more.

Let's just say that first batch of popovers was soooo tasty! A little breadier than I'd expected, and I later found out why. It's of vital importance to have the empty pan in the oven as it heats up. Somehow I'd missed that little detail. But no bother, they were still eye-rolling, lip-smacking good.

So my next try was again a HBH recipe, Salted Rosemary Popovers with Honey Butter. Oh yeah. Another trip out to the herb garden, some of our favorite Maldon flaked salt, and honey butter. This batch 'popped' a little better, and again, with a very happy and delicious result.

So. Have you tried them? Do tell! And if you have a recipe I should try, I'd love to hear about it, because I've been thinking about the next batch all week!

17 comments:

  1. The first time I made popovers was in home ec...MANY moons ago. A couple years ago I purchased a pan and WOW. We make them a lot...a perfect accompaniment to salads or soups or just because.

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  2. Your popovers look scrumptious! They can be impossible to make at high altitude but the Colorado extension service had a recipe that works. Yorkshire pudding, baked over beef drippings, is made with the same recipe.

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    1. I'm glad you mentioned Yorkshire Pudding; I was wondering ..! We don't have special tins for them: use either the roasting pan once the beef has been removed, or use muffin tins for individual ones. They still pop over, but are smaller - made with less batter. They're just as tasty!

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    2. Thankfully, altitude isn't an issue here. One day I may have to try Yorkshire pudding too!

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  3. They look yummy! By the way, love the shoes!

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  4. off to scour the internet for gluten free popover recipes..... no I've never tried them but yours have my stomach growling

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  5. We've had popovers for Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter for as long as I can remember. Once Mom died, it fell to me to make them. They don't get as giant as those in your picture but they are tasty. Mom always used the recipe on Wondra flour so that's all I've ever made.

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  6. My goodness, but those look good! I've never eaten a popover, but I'd sure like to try. Too bad a particular pan is needed to make them, as we rarely invest in the specialty items needed to make something. But I can sure admire what you've done. Should you ever find yourself in Florida, please travel with your pan and I'll invite you for dinner! (And you're welcome to spend the night too.)

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  7. My mom made them when I was growing up, and later on as an adult, I used to indulge in them once at year at the Northhampton Hilton in Massachusetts. Haven't had one in years but absolutely love them. Perhaps it is time for this old woman to splurge on a popover pan!

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    1. Perhaps! That was my thought a couple of weeks ago! I'm glad I did!

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  8. I fell in love with popovers in England many years ago. I tried them in cupcake pans but.. nah.
    I finally found a popover pan in a specialty cook store in the mall (pre-internet). It was worth the price. We make them at least 1/mo. Even put ice-cream in the hot center and drizzle with hot chocolate. Serve immediately. YUM.

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    1. oh wow. That's an idea I hadn't heard about - the ice cream! I have yet to try mini ones in a cupcake pan...

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  9. You can make these in a standard muffin tin, no special pan required. I make them for breakfast pretty frequently.
    My recipe:
    1 egg
    1/2 cup milk
    1 tbs melted butter
    1/4 tsp salt
    1/2 cup flour
    Preheat over to 425 and place pan in oven to heat up.
    Whip everything but the flour until slightly frothy. Stir in flour until just mixed in.
    Remove pan from oven and spray with cooking spray. Pour mix evenly between 5 of the muffin cups. Add a bit of water to the empty 6th cup for extra steam.
    Bake for 20 minutes or until golden brown.

    You can use this as a base recipe and stir in whatever else you'd like. You can easily double or triple the recipe if needed.

    For popovers reminiscent of Dutch babies, add 1 tsp vanilla, 2 tbs sugar, and 1 tsp cinnamon. Serve w maple syrup.

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  10. My family practically demands popovers a couple of times a month. My husband grew up eating them with jam, but I grew up with them strictly savoury. Delicious both ways!

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  11. Great. Now I need a popover. :)

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  12. Popovers are a staple in the winter months... generally with soup or stews. We love them plain hot or cold. I just use a regular muffin tin... bake really hot for the first 15 minutes and then turn the oven down to moderate baking temps for the last half hour. I suppose you could stir in any combination of spices that you fancy, and any ingredients... that are not to heavy or large... so they will float as the batter puffs.

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